The Mayor of Bath

History of Bath

The Legend

Prince Bladud lived around 800 BC and was the son of Lud Hudibras, King of the Britons. After contracting a skin disease on his travels abroad, he was banished from the tribe and found work as a swineherd in the Avon Valley. Food was scarce and his pigs became infected and diseased. In Swainswick, where a farmer advised him to look for acorns on the other side of the river, the pigs began to wallow in hot mud. To entice them out, Bladud climbed an oak tree, collected some acorns and made a trail out of the water. As the pigs came out he scraped the mud from their skin to find that it was cleansed and cured. He jumped in and emerged to find his skin clear and his disease, which was probably leprosy, healed. The Prince returned to the tribe. When Bladud became King he established a settlement in Bath and the city grew around the temple he built by the hot springs.

The Reality

Signs of human activity around the springs date from c5000 BC. The Celts lived in hill forts and settlements around the valley at Little Solsbury (abandoned in 300 BC) and Bathampton Down (abandoned 450 BC).

Further Reading

Georgian Bath

Three men were to be instrumental in transforming a medieval walled City of 3,000 people into an elegant Georgian City with a population of 30,000.

Charity Ball - 19th Feb '11

Charity Ball - 19th February 2011

Saxon Bath

It was almost 200 years before the Saxons gained full control of the south of England after the withdrawal of the Romans. In 577, there was a great battle to the north of Bath at Dyrham. The Saxons triumphed, killing three local kings and taking the three

"Floreat Bathon" May Bath flourish