The Mayor of Bath

The Mayor's Corps of Honorary Guides

                                                                                 

Please click here for all the Mayor's Guides information: www.bathguides.org.uk

If you have joined one of our walks and would like to give feedback on your experience, please go to www.bathguides.org.uk and complete the feedback form on the 'Contact Us' page.

Walk Back in Time with the Mayor's Guides

In 2011 The Mayor of Bath, Councillor Bryan Chalker, toasted his Honorary Guides at the launch of their new book 'Walk Back in Time with the Mayor's Guides - Eight Intriguing Walks Through Bath's History'.  Councillor Chalker thanked the Guides for agreeing that all profits will be donated to his charity - The Mayor of Bath's Relief Fund, which helps residents of the City facing hardship.

The new publication has maps and directions so walkers can go in their own time and pace to discover the people, places and activities which made Bath famous.  The eight walks cover:-

Two Waterways and Two Parks by Terry Mitchell

Mediaeval Life and Times of Bath by Audrey Woods,

Lyncombe and Widcombe by Jean Amesbury and Myra Barnes

Victorian Bath by Kirsten Elliott

Quirky Bath by Jean Amesbury and Myra Barnes

Bath at War, 1939 - 1945 by Allan Williams

Walcot, the Paragon and Broad Street by Margaret Burrows

The Navy in Bath by Donald Percy

The book is available at a discounted price direct from the Mayor's Guides via the Mayor's Office in the Guildhall, or from Good Buy Books, Oldfield Park Bookshop, Number One Royal Crescent and Toppings Book Company.

Further Reading

Saxon Bath

It was almost 200 years before the Saxons gained full control of the south of England after the withdrawal of the Romans. In 577, there was a great battle to the north of Bath at Dyrham. The Saxons triumphed, killing three local kings and taking the three

Introduction to the Mayor of Bath Website

Medieval Bath

Bath became a city of trade and prospered from the woollen industry. It was ideally situated as drovers could bring their sheep in from the edge of the Cotswold Hills, the River Avon powered the mills and proximity to the port of Bristol helped the trader

"Floreat Bathon" May Bath flourish